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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)
-road. way off-road. this is a boston duck. it's a truck that's not afraid to get wet. >> this is, i believe, our 12th season on the boston duck tours. >> we took a special ride on the boston duck tour. it's a way to see the city from land and water in the same vehicle. the ducks were around long before this tour began. they go all the way back to world war ii. and what is a boston duck? >> a boston duck is basically a world war ii amphibious landing craft that has been converted into a touring vehicle. so we take people around the city of boston on land and then also into the charles river. these vehicles were used for a lot of different things during world war ii. and mainly they were used as a supply vehicle because they could take supplies from ships onto the mainland. >> the amphibious trucks became known as "dukws." originally designed by general motors, the duck was 31 feet long and 8 feet wide. that's over three times the size of your average s.u.v. it weighed 6½ tons, even though it had no armor. it traveled 50 miles per hour on land and 6 miles per hour in water. it's a challenge
of those i was the general manager in boston at there and i am aware of the operating practices there, and it's beston and pick the government center and the green line -- several lines go into the green line and trains frequently switched there. that is just one example. we also reached out after we saw the initial report that said that others did not do switchbacks. we reached out to other transit systems that we listed in our response that owls do switchbacks so again the same caveat. all of the other transit systems will tell you would they prefer not to do switchbacks? yes they would. in some cases, in the case of bart they have tracks and they can do other things but they also do switch backs and schedule them everyday as well, so in our view and base some of our personal experiences and discussions with others, other systems do use switch backs. >> okay. maybe i will ask the grand jury this as well, but from your point of view were these not jurisdictions communicating to them during the course of their investigation? >> i did not see that until the finding so we were brief
boston, seattle, new york, oakland and san jose or santa clara mta. they all had higher scores than muni. muni was on the bottom. we included bart. since they said other systems did it we decided to look at the systems in paris france. it took months to identify the right officials and in this case either the head of operations or the systems schedulinger all but one which was new york agreed to an extensive interview by two of us and per the rules we were not identified. nevertheless of the interviews as described in the report were significant. all transit systems it became clear had multiple systems that were similar and had challenges and all needed to deal with complex traffic, scheduling, and terrain problems uniquely their own, and yet as we had known the san francisco controller's survey had shown all had higher reliability and rider seaferz than muni and we determined that all systems use switchbacks they only did so in cases of equipment break down or emergencies except for one. one system which happened to be the santa clara mta does use switch backs and interesting
ads, the boston ads. i think people want a little break. introducing a little lefty into the campaign it at this late date i think voters appreciate it. lissa: did you run other ads where you hit your opponent over the head with a hammer or something just to balance it all out? >> yeah. there has been a hard fought campaign in the 6th congressional district and north shore of massachusetts so it is kind of a nice way to end it. but we've been talking about the economy and the debt and getting, you know, the job market back in this area and throughout the country. you know, throughout the course of the campaign. and, i think voters listening to the message but want a little, like i said, a little levity at this point. melissa: have you heard from folks about the ad in particular? or has it gone by unnoticed because people sort relax but don't know what it is for? >> no. definitely noticed. you know what? good way to cut through the clutter right now. we have a pretty intense congressional campaign, a u.s. senate campaign, a new hampshire is right next door to us on the boston media ma
dukakis because a lot of my family still lives there, and i'm from there. i lost boston in 1977 when i left u.p.a. and "the new york times" and moved to washington for "time" magazine. >> where did you go to school? >> i went to college in maine, and finished up at brandice university. >> when did you first get interested in photography? >> very, very young. i was maybe 10 years old, 11 years old. my stepsister was roberta who was a journalist at the "proof dins journal" and a gentleman named win parks was working there. i forgot the other gentleman's name. but there were two photographers there, and i had some interest in cameras. she brought one of them home, and they taught me a little bit about cameras. i set up a little dark room. i was maybe 11 or 12 when that happened. and then i dropped it, as kids do, for like 10 or 12 years, and then i worked on the high school year book. i was interested for four or five months, and then didn't touch the camera for 10 years, eight years. >> what got you back to it? >> it was interesting. when i finally went back to school, i went to brandice
both submitted our economic proposals to the boston globe. they were sent out four independent economic analysis. what the independent economists found is that i was 67% more effective at cutting the deficit then senator brown. why? because i am willing to make cuts. i am willing to make substantial cuts. i support substantial cuts. i also believe we have to raise revenues. that is what it will take to get serious about our deficit. i truly believe on this one, this is about our children and grandchildren. we cannot leave it to our grandchildren to pay off our debts. >> great question. we are in the $16 trillion national debt. we are in another trillion dollar deficit. you cannot keep borrowing to pay our bills. when we are talking about cutting military spending, we have party cut in half a trillion dollars. that affects many people in this room and people watching. i have been battling as a member of the arms services committee to try to find the resources to protect our men and women who are serving. we have sequestration coming up. we are trying to work in a bipartisan effort to ste
louis lowenthal and responsive, in cardiac arrest. they placed him on advanced life-support in boston to the hospital where he died several leaders -- several days later. he was a rising star and all- around nice teenager. what exactly happened right now is not clear but friends and committee members are devastated. -- community members are devastated. >> i am really good friends with his sister. i know it will be really hard for her and her parents. if something happened to my brother like that, i would not know what to do. >> an attorney for the north baltimore o'clock the club says they send their thoughts and prayers to the family but have no further comments because the family has asked for privacy. >> a long cleanup from superstorm sandy continues. tonight mary -- mayor bloomberg has canceled the new york city marathon but food, fuel and power are still out in the hardest-hit areas. >> four days later, the theory of sandy is too much -- the fuyr ry of sandy is too much to bear. >> we need help here. we truly do. we need someone to come and tell us which way to go. >> many simply
storm from washington all the way up towards new york and boston. but i do think we're setting up for that pattern. we'll see a trough, a deep trough, along the east coast. that means that storm coming up from the gulf of mexico. it could mean rain for us and possibly snow. i'll break that down for you, but right now, it's all about current temperatures. 35 in winchester, 35 in gaithersburg. i'll let you know about the weekend plus what i think about our next storm coming up. >> okay, doug, thank you. now, to the final stretch for the race for the white house. both president obama and mitt romney battled the ohio tonight. mitt romney spoke to a large crowd in west chester. the president spoke in lie ma, ohio. he'll have one more stop in the buckeye stay before he heads to wisconsin, iowa and then northern virginia. his rally, jiffy lube live tomorrow. >> today was the last day of early voting in maryland. and the lines wrapped around the building in some places, ased p their ballot. >> reporter: i can see that you're so cold, you're crying. >> yes, i am. >> reporter: dedicated vot
. and after they tore his acl. late in the boston college game. and now the sports department, they want to know how rare it is to lose this many games, so they put it out to several schools. no one has heard of such a thing. uncharted territory. that's what they are calling it. the kick off tomorrow at 12:30. >>> on campus tonight. maryland exhibition hoops, verses indiana, pennsylvania. the freshman, no need to ask. he is a smooth operator. 16 points for the woodbridge native. winning it 63-71 next friday as that will not be true. they play their first playoff game in five seasons. the black and red will be taking on new york. scheduling note here. and the game has been switched to rfk stadium because of hurricane sandy. kick off at 8:00. the team wants their fans to wear black. all right, that should be fun tomorrow. and the implications galore coming up, especially in maryland. nobody is going to go to the tough streets of bethesda. expecting to get a wh'so ecl oumi byb cese? 'sheas -wh! lahi ] t'thtay 0%atal tt cesth - o tnkou ..oewhev yoreoi. inbabechse omheauinco ha y lgh tay chnd
+.ó boston, wens iris or boy we are allvgá÷ san franciscans. some of us are natives, like my daughters.yothers are immigrante imcome babt and myself. over the next four years as5j san franciscans, we will all expend $25 billion. i would like to see that money used to make this wind and fog swept peninsula the best that it has ever been. $25 billion is an enormous fortune and in four years time that investment could find all of our citizens on the same page, and make san francisco the envy of the world. i support projects that we all favor, and will facilitate such projects if elected, rather than ill-conceived, divisive projects like the central subway or eight washington street. i pledge, if elected as your supervisor, to serve the entire four years in that office. will the 9q make that same pledttremember ty considered being appointed as the district attorney, and run unsuccessfully for mayor twice. will he run again in 2014 for the state assembly? the incumbent, if reelected, may be real estat replaced by an apd supervisor for half the next term. i find that unacceptable in our demo
is chief investment officer at eaton vance management. he joins us from that firm in boston. duncan, i take it you're a pessimist in regards to avoiding the fisca cliff that we're going to go over? c not really a pessimist. i think the fiscal cliff is going to be more of a fiscal slope, but there will be a tax element to it. i think because we're starting at such a low level of tax rates, we're very likely to have higher ta s either immediately with the expiration of the payroll tax and potentially on capital gains and dividends in 2013 and beyond. >> tom: how should invests approach that, invest on what tax rates may be next year? >> not really. but there a t great costs to be avoided by lessening the tax drag on your investment. positioning your portfolio and making sure you're in sthookso can outperform in a rising interest rate environment-- which is another thing we're worried about-- longer term makes a some sense. >> tom: so rising interest rate environment, possibly higher inflation, higher taxes. not exactly the most shiny of forecasts for investors. >> well, there if something you
. >> seth carny of boston, massachusetts, is an old school carnival performer with an old school carnival knack for separating people from their money. >> at the carnival, we had a little running joke that it cost $2 to get in and $7 more to get out because the $2 admission to get in covered our expenses to be on the lot, but the inside money from the pitches is what paid everybody's salaries for the week to be there. >> halloween is a busy season for seth. by night, he's outside performing as an evil clown, roping in the crowds at the haunted mansion. by day, he's a medieval torturer inside king richard's renaissance fair. >> welcome to the torture show. i look extremely intimidating in this outfit, but it works to my advantage when i'm trying to sell because i can make fun of myself in this outfit. they love me. they really love me. i'll stand at my bone shop cart, and i'll tell people, oh, especially reserved customer, oh, you don't have to be afraid of me. i'm really just a big fat teddy bear. >> teddy bear? bone shoppe? that's right. when he's not on stage can shocking audiences with
.a. and boston and we talk about what we're working on and san francisco is one of the leaders they look up to and how to do it and we are doing things on a national scale people are taking notice of and doing that and i heard a lot of talk, and i come from the private sector so when i first got here one of the questions i got "how is government different from the private sector" from the it standpoint. it's night and day. you have hard time drawing parallels and from the private sector come to government thinking that a lot of our ideas and methods of success in the private sector are directly applicable to how we do work in government, and it's a different problem to solve frankly. it's something i have to relearn frequently that the large company i came from was a large monolithic corporation and 1ceo and pyramid up and trickled and everyone did what they did. government as you know we're are a highly decentralized independently elected, independently operated with our boards and commissions. as much as i would like to say i had the authority or will or desire to cast my will on the
into the project. whether we hailed fromv$dw beijing or e+.ó boston, wens iris or bombay we are allvgá÷ san franciscans. some of us are natives, like my daughters.y others are immigrants like the imcome babt and myself. over the next four years as5j san franciscans, we will all expend $25 billion. i would like to see that money used to make this wind and fog swept peninsula the best that it has ever been. $25 billion is an enormous fortune and in four years time that investment could find all of our citizens on the same page, and make san francisco the envy of the world. i support projects that we all favor, and will facilitate such projects if elected, rather than ill-conceived, divisive projects like the central subway or eight washington street. i pledge, if elected as your supervisor, to serve the entire four years in that office. will the 9q make that same pledtt remember that he has already considered being appointed as the district attorney, and run unsuccessfully for mayor twice. will he run again in 2014 for the state assem
surprise. we will be in boston, mitt romney's home state of massachusetts. the -- "the willis report" will be live. that is it for tonight. thank you for joining us. don't forget to record the show if you cannot catch us live.
. and nbc has the president up by 6 points. got all that? joining us now from boston, david. he directs polling. >> he want to run it down from your point of view. you have canvassed the whole country, know what's going on. ohio, how do you see it? >> i see it really close. if you look at the last four polls, it's one point. 1 through 8 the poll was average four to five points. what we look at is the head-to-head number. the last three consecutive polls, excluding the two you mentioned were at 48. that's a sign of vulnerability. obviously you have seven candidates on the ballot. i think those polls that had the plus four, plus five overstated obama's support because they overcounting a strong democratic county, and they had a party differential in those polls of democrats with an 8 point advantage party affiliation. >> so you see romney momentum in ohio? >> i see romney strong enough to be within a point. and that's exactly where the last four polls showed him. >> so the governor has a very, very -- he has a very good chance in ohio. how about florida? >> i don't think so. as we talked
politics poll average has warren up by 4.5. politico is up there in boston covering the race. dave, thanks for joining us from politico. >> absolutely. >> let me ask you about that race. it seems like something happened a couple weeks ago. was it the mayor's endorsement and putting all the troops? but that's only 8% of the electorate. what got her on top of the race? >> i think it's women voters that were in brown's camp, still sort of flirting with him this summer in polls, moving towards warren, and i talked to some pollsters and voters on the ground today, and that's all you hear about on the airwaves, in the messaging. it's all designed to court women voters. some of them declaring themselves independents, although democrats have a big registration advantage up here 3 to 1, but i think if you look inside the polls, that's what's given warren the lead. brown still beats her among independents overall, but he's losing female voters. she has widened the gender gap. >> you're going to have a big turnout. not like january of 2010 when he won that first time. here are the closing ads from wa
, very well the folks in boston who are running the romney campaign are looking at the numbers and they know it is that much harder to unseat a sitting president when your approval numbers are close to 50% and maybe even above it. >> david, we had the radical governors in a number of states on the republican side who have refused to work with the president and stalled a great deal. in fact, they have attacked public sector workers, some 3 million public sector jobs have been let go in the four years here, especially in the last couple of years there has been a lot of them. what if they had not been let go? what would our economy look like? >> well, we would be in much better shape, ed. you can figure out how much the economy needed stimulus, it is a simple mathematical equation. spending equals income. income equals spending. if one goes down, the other has to go down. when the private sector goes into recession, that's when the government should increase spending. when the private sector is doing well, that's when you cut back on government spending. that's what clinton was do
's a big las vegas booyah. >> staten island new york hey now forget about it booyah. >> boston. >> nashville. >> michigan. >> california. >> booyahs come from all across america. let cramer help you channel yours. "mad money" with jim cramer weeknights. >>> tonight we have shown you how to look for signs of what to do with your portfolio over the long run. because the earnings report and the subsequent conference calls are the crucial thing. here's the deal. they don't have to be shoot first ask questions later experiences. actually the opposite. conference calls are ask questions, ask questions, then ask some more questions. and only then maybe take action. we are asking specifically about what the growth of the earnings per share might be and how expensive that would make the stock versus other stocks in the sector. and maybe other stocks in the market as a whole. usually regarded as being the s & p 500. we want questions answered about gross margins, whether they're going to be increasing. why we have to judge if earnings estimates might be beaten in the future. we are looki
final frenzy, that last bit of energy now that boston these candidates are giving it with just three days to go. let's go over the president's schedule. he started in ohio. they are in milwaukee at this point waiting for the president. he's airborne heading in that direction towards wisconsin. iowa and virginia. he end up in virginia and northern virginia tonight. i'll be out there accompanied by the dave matthews band. i'm looking forward to it. tomorrow sunday in new hampshire. florida. ohio. back to ohio and colorado. monday wisconsin, guess where, ohio after that. and then iowa before he finishes up in chicago where he will spend election eve. ohio we should mention nbc news and the marist organization yesterday put out their poll for ohio has the president up six. a whopping margin compared to what we've seen in the past. our poll even has the president up two in florida. so the obama team certainly optimistic and down the stretch they come to keep that sports metaphor going. >> love it. thank you. >> as for the challenger mitt romney needs to rally his troops and out gun the p
for their home opener in boston tonight at 7:00 on comcast sportsnet. rookie bradley biel who is playing in his first regular season game at the verizon center excited to play in front of the home crowd. >> i'm really excited. my family will be there and actually this is my town now. this is my city so to speak so now i have to be here to represent and show what i'm capable of doing as well as my teammates. we have a great team this year. hopefully the fans will support us through the whole year. >> your local college football games today linebacker turned qb sean petty and the terps host georgia tech. virginia hits the road to face nc state. it's the battle for the real deal in d.c. as howard battles with hampton. west virginia visits tcu. navy welcomes the fighting alfred morrises otherwise known as the florida atlantic owls. don't forget the other football going on later. d.c. united kicking off the 2012 playoffs hosting the new york red bulls at rfk tonight at 8:00. hoping their fans get rfk rocking. and that's your sports minute. i'm carol maloney. hope your saturday is a good one. >> than
will see you monday from boston. neil: the new york city marathon is off. it is off. and we think we know why. >> i think the marathon is a disgrace and shame on mayor bloomberg. he is painting bluelines come allowing people to cross over the bridge and they should all be running here to staten island to help us. he is providing generators for this marathon. he is providing people to go to bathrooms when people don't even have homes in staten island. there's electricity and there's no heat in the water. it is a disgrace what he is doing and it is a real disgrace. neil: we do find it odd that after that interview the entire marathon was off. all eyes are on a battered new york. the rodney dangerfield of rows in new york that hadn't gotten a lick of attention. until today. went to the fox reporter and producer and camera crew to shed light on an embarrassing situation at a time when loc officials, state officials, even national officials were appraising relief efforts and leave it to some guys to say, you know, it's not so hunky-dory. in staten island, it wasn't going so well. withi
from boston back to new york and maybe even western pennsylvania. you could get some of that snow. remember, this thing is six days away. a nor'easter is almost impossible to forecast properly 24 hours away. so you're going to have to let the forecasters get a handle on this. it is going to be cold. philadelphia, you will be in the 30s. new york city, all the way down to 33 by tuesday morning. that's the low for the day. highs only in the 40s. you have five million people without power. you don't need more wind. you don't need more rain. you don't need rain coming in windows that don't exist or roofs that are gone. you certainly don't need temperatures in the 30s when you don't have heat. >> we got to try to get electricity to folks quickly because before temperatures really drop. it's already brutally cold out here. appreciate the update on that. >>> the death toll from sandy now approaching 100 in this country. we're learning more about the lives that were lost and we honor some of those lives ahead. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event i
, politics and public policy. good afternoon to boston you. >> hi there. >> doug i'll start with you. we pay attention to the presidential candidates. generally speaking how much of an impact can something like a fight over judges, how much of an impact can something like this happen when it comes to voter turnout? >> kit have a huge impact especially on the local level and in this case on state level. what's at stake here are a couple of things. first of all to what degree will the supreme court remain independent from either political party. in florida, in the '70s they stopped voting for supreme court justice and they were being afrointd a nominating list that the governor then would appeal to in order to appoint the justices and then they stood for retention. the coke brothers another far right-wing group here have tar get these particular justices because they want to really impose willy-nilly their will upon florida. you know, they control the legislature, they control the governor's office now they want to control the supreme -- now t will be overloaded with people who can be appointe
benjamin franklin is toddling around boston.ve you can imagine what that might've been like. when i was writing about franklin, i realized that a large part of the story was s consisto consist of franklin growing old. because he becamet america's emissary to france during the american revolution at the age of 70. and i started writing about franklin when i was around 40i years old orbo so. i really wondered whether i wase going to be able to understando franklt was like to grow old. partly for this reason, i decided, and this has carried through in my other vote, i decideo te tell my story. i tried to relate the lives of mys, characters as much as possible through the perceptions, the words of people who saw them. people who knewperc them. kw my books tend to have more of eyewitness type stuff and some. if i others.ave if i have a choice between in mw writing a scene in my own words and writing a scene in the words of somebody there, whole i willn tend to go towards the person who is was there. i think that conveys a certain authenticity. i will say that it relieves the burden of p
strange. >> here is why the romney campaign in boston probably is uncomfortable with what chris christie was doing. he was their number one attack dog. remember, he was the keynote speaker at the convention. he was the one that was able to not only throw the red meat and then stand in front of the crowd an just tear it apart and everyone would cheer and scream. and hurricane sandy comes threw, and he is gone. he is not filling that role anymore hi, see also the guy who in that keynote speech could barely bring himself to say mitt romney's name. it wasn't like he was the most ardent romney lover. >> and even when he was -- he was one of the first guys out of the gate to endorse romney, which i think is surprising. constitutionally they seem like such different people. i have been saying for a while on the show, and i believe this is true. you know, part of my problem with mitt romney's candidacy is i feel he has an incredibly crass view of the american public, and really doesn't hold them in particularly high regard in so far he has changed his position on all of these issues numerous tim
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)

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